This is a project from my work at Perkins+Will, with Mario Guttman and Tim Meador. I hope you enjoy!

Perkins+Will Grasshopper Users Group

HI There,

Mario Guttman and Tim Meador have developed a new geometry importer from Grasshopper to Revit. I have started using it on a project and wanted to share the initial results with you. You can download all of the Hummingbird items here http://ghhummingbird.wordpress.com/

Image

this project is in it’s initial design phase and we are trying out a variety of skin systems/types on a fairly conservative massing. The developer wants to get an innovative design while not giving up sq’, how unusual right. So my initial thought was that grasshopper could really help that iterative process, wouldn’t it be great if we could speed up the Revit process as well.

ImageImageImageImage

well all Tim and I had to do was get Mario excited about this and away we go!  As always just email me and I will share the definitions etc. with you. Good luck!

ImageImageImageImageImage

View original post

Advertisements

CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL- A New Diridon Station In San Jose

This is a visioning study down by the Perkins+Will San Francisco Office. The designers were Bill Katz and Jess Austin (me!) Andrew Wolfram was the managing principal and Arup provided engineering consultation.

ImageImageImage

This first scheme was developed to be a lighter weight structure that sailed above the current Diridon Station while creating a new space for The Proposed High Speed Rail. The structural diagram for this option was fairly simple, the large white members held themselves vertically with some basic columns helping out. The smaller cable like wire would provide the lateral support and respond to each unique loading condition. I used grasshopper to build the majority of this model hoping that any sizing or stress information we received from Arup could be integrated into the model. Thereby creating a feedback loop between the design and the structural requirements. Because this project was so short (two weeks!) we didn’t have the chance, but I know it can be done. The incredibly talented Ripon De Leon is updating our ColoniaTecne Project based on Buro Happold’s input.

ImageImageImage

This second scheme had some input from Andrew Tsay-Jacobs in our office. He went to engineering school and received three degrees before going to Columbia for his March; which is to say I think he’s very interesting. While he didn’t run any analysis or come up with any hard numbers we did sketch out a diagram that we think could work. Essentially the large columns are a vertical cantilever that triangulate at the bottom and there are smaller members that create an overall diaphragm for the roof. All very conceptual but this model was also made with grasshopper in the hopes that each member could be optimized. I am not publishing those definitions because they are a mess, and I think Perkins+Will might own them because I made them there. I hope you like it!

ColoniaTecne Approved for Design Development-Invited To Group Exhibition in Seattle Gallery

BIOS Design Collective was invited to present some recent work and we thought this would be a great opportunity to share our latest design of ColoniaTecne our project that will be in the San Jose 2012 Biennial. This is one of the boards created for the group show at The Art On The Ridge Gallery in Seattle Washington. The project is an interactive pavilion that will engage the public through site and sound. The person experiencing the project will move through a “net” of sensors that interpret movement, sound and proximity and re-interpret that information as a display of light and sound. ColoniaTecne will react to its environment and create a new environment through interpretation, there by changing the paradigm of a typical structure from environmental control to environmental responsiveness. This project takes systemic cues from the cooperative nature of corral reefs. In corral reefs many individuals work in unison (coral polyps) to create the overall reef. Each individual responds to environmental factors that affect the final reef structure. Environmental factors include heat, light, food etc.

Latest renderings of the the project showing a more detailed understanding of connections and construction.

Two scaled models were also made for the exhibition. These models show our latest idea about structural bracing throughout the form. The waffle system is doubled with one on top of the other creating a triangulation between the two systems. This allows us visual complexity through simple design principles.

SJ01- New Conceptual Pavillions

This is new iteration for our ongoing study into ColoniaTechne. The project that was selected to be in the SJ01-2012 art exhibition. In this first study I was thinking that the pavilion could be made out of strands of some inexpensive, durable and fully recyclable material. The members would take the compression and tension like a net or membrane structure. This would have the advantage of being light and hopefully strong.

This was made in grasshopper through the blending of a couple of simple definitions. First there is the surface from curves, then Diagrid from surface and the image sampler, and lastly project to surface. The idea being that the circles represent interactive components on the skin of the pavilion, and that skin and component relationship can be adaptive to differing criteria.

 

the next test is really geared towards a larger project or venue. Last year Charlie and I got to the final round of a competition for  Denver International Airport. Although we didn’t win (we lost by 1 point!) it started me thinking about larger scale projects with different criteria for aesthetic evaluation. This is a study of a sculptural installation based on the work of Erwin Hauer. The diffuse light qualities and the structural integrity of the overall piece are something pulled from investigations into Hauer’s work. 

Scale Pavillion

This is the inside of the Scale Pavilion. The hope is that this temporary structure would sustain itself once fabricated. The PV affixed scales would provide any energy needed. The open shaded space would work well as a temporary respite from very warm climates like San Jose or Phoenix. This is of course derivative on a biological/ morphological level to many creatures that exist in arid hot climates.

I enjoy the process of making, both digitally and physically. I hope this image which is taken from a line drawing shows some of the complexity in the project. That part of the designing is my favorite, when I am less critical of a project but really thinking about how the project will be built. This project was created mostly with Paneling Tools from Rajaa Issa ( Thank you! click here:http://wiki.mcneel.com/labs/panelingtools) and some of my own add-on techniques.

Ultimately the question of aesthetics and this type of project must come up. For me it is important to see a project through to a certain stage before self-evaluation can really begin. If I as a designer start to evaluate to early the creative process can become stifled and tendency towards style can lead down a very wrong path. Having reached a part of process that I am now comfortable with I can evaluate this project. I think literally it is not beautiful but the idea is very clear and that is a beautiful. With more refinement this may turn out…

posted by Jess Austin

Sustainable Skyscraper

This project is a design for a sustainable skyscraper, in that the building not only reduces it energy consumption it also produces much of the energy it uses. The outer skin of this double skinned building is made up of Photovoltaic film “printed” onto glass. The dual skin system allows for passive cooling and greatly reduces the solar gain for the building.

This patterning is taken directly from the forest canopy, the trees leaves spread out across the tops of the canopy try to gather or harvest as much of the sun’s rays as possible. In a similar way this building’s skin harvests the rays off the sun to feed the organism. The dappled light coming into the building created by the openness of the second skin creates an intricate and beautiful effect. This effect can be controlled based on programmatic needs, denser canopy and less light in the gallery or looser more open in the housing.

The morphology of the tower follows a very simple logic-Maximize sun exposure. The total foot print of the site is extruded and turned to a southern exposure and then pinched to flatten and slope the southern face.